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Sunday 13 July, 2003
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FAQ Section - Frequently Asked Questions

Table of Contents

  1. What is Paper Tole?
  2. Where can I find Paper Tole Kits Especially for Beginners?
  3. How can I get started? Do I need to go to a class?
  4. What special skills do I need to do Paper Tole or 3d Decoupage?
  5. What tools and supplies do I need to start with?
  6. I have decided to try a Paper Tole project. How do I Order?
  7. Can I order knowing that my credit card details are secure?
  8. I have decided to order, how long does it take for me to receive my kits?
  9. What about your prices?? How competitive are they? Am I getting a good deal?
  10. How Do I Know if a kit I selected is easy or hard to do?
  11. How many prints should I use for my project?
  12. I think I need instructions, do your kits come with instructions?
  13. Okay, I have my project in front of me, where do I start?
  14. Should I mount the base print first?
  15. Are you sure I can cut pieces out of the base print? What about the holes left behind?
  16. How do I mount the base print?......and on what?
  17. Do I have to spray my base print with anything before I start?
  18. I have read elsewhere I should straight cut, and not bevel cut? What is the correct way?
  19. Should I cut out all the pieces at the start?
  20. I have decided to cut everything at the start. How can I store these pieces in order?
  21. What about coloring the edges? Is it necessary to color the edges of the cutouts and if so, with what?
  22. Woops! I accidentally cut through a piece. Can I repair this cutout? How do I do it?
  23. What is shaping? I read elsewhere all I have to do is stack one piece on the other?
  24. What tool should I use to shape the pieces? What is the best Shaping Tool?
  25. When I shape some pieces, the paper crinkles on the edges. How do I correct this?
  26. What type of glue should I use?
  27. I read somewhere that I should coat the back of my prints? Is this necessary?
  28. How much glue should I use?
  29. I have a small piece I wish to glue, how can I apply a small amount of glue to the cutout?
  30. Woops!! I accidentally smudged some silicone on my base print what can I do?
  31. Do I have to wait until the glue sets on the first piece before I apply another piece?
  32. I glued a piece down, but dont like the way I shaped it, what can I do?
  33. I saw some paper tole pictures that were built out a mile!! Is this correct? My work looks flat compared to this??
  34. How long do I have to wait for the glue to dry before I varnish?
  35. What about varnishing? Do I cover everything with varnish?
  36. How many coats of varnish should I use?
  37. How long should I wait between coats?
  38. I have varnished an area, and I do not think I like it, can I remove the varnish?
  39. Okay, everything looks great, what options do I have regarding framing?
  40. I saw some budget frames at the Warehouse, can I use these for my Paper Tole project?
  41. Everyone loves my work, and I have been asked to Tole a Family Photograph. Can I do this?
  42. I like your FAQ section...How do I get you to impart more of your knowledge to me?

1. What is Paper Tole?

Paper tole is a fun craft/art form which transforms a 2 dimensional image (picture) into a 3d picture, by selectively cutting, shaping, and gluing individual components from copies of the original image. The result is a beautiful life like creation that is your own work of art, as there are no two finished paper tole projects that are identical. Paper Tole is sometimes referred to as "Papertole", or "3d decoupage", "papier tole", "3d art", or sometimes just "decoupage".

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2. Where can I find Paper Tole Kits Especially for Beginners?

We have selected areas of our webstore where you can find special starter kits, and paper tole kits that have been individually selected just for beginners. The craft is sometimes known as 3d decoupage overseas.

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3. How can I get started? Do I need to go to a class?

The short answer is no, you do not need to go to a class. Many people have started and gone on to be very good in this craft without ever haven taken a class. Paper Tole is a very easy craft to learn. The most important skills include cutting, shaping, and gluing. You can quite easily start this craft by purchasing a starter kit, and some easier projects, learning as you go, and end up with some great results. Even some of the more advanced techniques can be learned on your own accord with appropriate resources, such as the furring and feathering books we have in our webstore. We have included a 4 page written guide in our starter kit to get you going off to a good start.

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4. What special skills do I need to do Paper Tole or 3d Decoupage?

You need no special skills to start this craft. As indicated above the most important area is your technique in cutting, shaping, and gluing. These are techniques that are learned by doing. There are advanced techniques that you can learn to do special projects.

You can educate yourself using many of the resources we have, and by reading about the craft, and looking at other projects that have been completed by experienced tolers.

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5. What tools and supplies do I need to start with?

Our starter kits contain all the tools you require to do this craft. Your tool kit will last you your entire life. There are some consumable items such as blades, non-acetic silicone that need to be topped up now and again, but your basic tools should last you your life time. You can find all of the extra materials you need in our paper crafts webstore.

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6. I have decided to try a Paper Tole project. How do I Order?

To order, go through our online catalog and make your selections. They will be highlighted on the right hand side of your screen. Along with the individual prices, the total of all your selections will be displayed as you are shopping so you know at all times what and how much your selections total. When you are finished shopping, simply submit your order and enter in your details. The order will be transmitted using SSL secure socket technology, which will absolutely protect all of your details.

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7. Can I order knowing that my credit card details are secure?

As noted above, we use the Pixelnet eComm Secure Server. This server is the latest SSL or secure socket layer technology, and locks the socket in which you are submitting your order. This means, that there is a secure line of communication between your computer and the eComm server, away from all prying eyes.

It has been noted, that using this technology, is safer than handing your card over to a shop assistant for processing your order. As you submit your order, you will see a picture in the bottom right hand corner of your browser bar, that looks like a padlock. This means than your socket has been locked, and any information that you enter, is entirely secure.

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8. I have decided to order, how long does it take for me to receive my kits?

We use Air International Courier Post. Typical delivery time to the US is approximately 5-7 days. Some of our orders have reached our customers in the US within 4 days. Delivery time to other parts of the world vary, but typical delivery times to Australia is 2-4 days, and other parts of the world may vary from 5-8 days.

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9. What about your prices?? How competitive are they? Am I getting a good deal?

Prices on our website are extremely competitive, with average savings on all of our kits between 33%-45%. This includes free delivery, and free cutting guides and instructions with all kits. You can shop with confidence knowing you are getting the best price on the internet for all of your Paper Tole Kits. If you see an equivalent kit, that includes cutting guides and free delivery elsewhere on the internet that is lower priced, kindly inform us, and we will equal or better that price. You can shop with confidence.

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10. How Do I Know if a kit I selected is easy or hard to do?

This is an excellent question for the new crafter. Generally speaking, the less complicated image with fewer elements, means that the project is easier to do. Also look for larger elements in the picture which would indicate that the kit would most likely suit a beginner. A kit that contains small intricate pieces, such as some of the Anton Pieck 7x9 s and 9x12 s, would better suit a person who has completed 5-7 projects.

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11. How many prints should I use for my project?

We have a page that discusses this very question. You can go here to view the contents of that page. Generally speaking, most projects can be completed using 5 prints. Some more complex kits require 6 or 7 prints, but rarely 8. Keep in mind that our instructions have been designed, so that you maximize the detail of your pictures, whilst keeping the number of prints you use down. Using modern tole techniques, it is rare in a project to use the same element more than 2 times in your picture. Stay away from "stacking" the images one on top of the other, and instead, carefully shape and sculpture your elements, which adds realism to your project.

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12. I think I need instructions, do your kits come with instructions?

That is what makes us unique. All of our kits we have in our online webstore come with cutting guides and instructions. All elements of the project are shown and numbered. The instructions are very detailed, ensuring that your finished picture looks great. You assemble the cutouts in numerical order. The instructions are suitable for all languages as they are graphically based.

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13. Okay, I have my project in front of me, where do I start?

First of all read the instructions carefully, and get an overall view of how the project is put together. Number your prints using a pencil, marking either on the back or near the bottom of each print. This will assist you in following the instructions. Make sure you have a sharp blade installed in your knife, and make a few practice cuts to warm up.

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14. Should I mount the base print first?

Depending on the kit, read the instructions to see if any pieces are extracted from the base print. If no pieces are taken from the base print you can mount the base print if you wish. It is a good idea to mount the base print on at least a 2 ply acid free mat board if the print is larger than 8x10. Smaller base prints can be mounted later if you wish.

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15. Are you sure I can cut pieces out of the base print? What about the holes left behind?

In some of our kits, we have "stolen" pieces from the base print to enhance the overall look of the project. The holes that are left behind, are later covered as the project is assembled. This is a common technique which is used by all experienced paper tolers. You may find later on in your project that perhaps you have made a mistake, and would otherwise require additional prints to recover from your mistake. In this case, if your base print has not been mounted, you can usually "steal" pieces from the base print to make up for your mistake, as long as you are covering the area where you extracted the "stolen" pieces.

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16. How do I mount the base print?......and on what?

There are several techniques in mounting your base print. Generally, you can mount the base print yourself for images 8x10 or smaller. On larger base prints, it is advisable for you to take the print down to your local framer and have it vacuum mounted. This is not a costly exercise, and will ensure that the base print is put down properly without bubbles or imperfections. You should mount your base print on at least a 2-ply acid free mat board. You can purchase this from your local framer, and it is not expensive. Any color or offcut will fill the bill. Use spray adhesive and spray the back of your print, as well as the board you are mounting it on. This is called a permanent mount and will not lift. If you choose to spray only one surface (i.e. the back of the print, or the mat board) this is called a temporary mount, and know that through time, this will lift.

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17. Do I have to spray my base print with anything before I start?

Coating your prints prior to cutting, is an option. By sealing your prints in this way, it assists in removing silicone, or other debris that may adhere to your prints whilst cutting and shaping. To protect your prints you can use a clear matte spray sealer. As stated, this is an option, and if you are careful in handling your prints, there is no real need to include this step.

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18. I have read elsewhere I should straight cut, and not bevel cut? What is the correct way?

Beginners are usually taught to straight cut. This means that the knife blade is perpendicular to the paper when cutting. Ideally, you should develop the technique of bevel cutting, by tilting your knife on an angle. This produces a thinner exposed cut-edge which is easier to disguise and means that you do not have to color the edges of your cutouts. If you straight cut, then you are faced with coloring the edges of your cutouts with a soft led pencil, or a special felt tip marker. It is best that you learn correctly, as this will save you alot of time in not having to color the edges. Very experienced paper tolers always bevel cut. Adopting the correct cutting technique from the start, ensures that you can develop your skills in this craft. Cutting technique is a primary skill and separates a good toler from a great toler.

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19. Should I cut out all the pieces at the start?

This really depends on how organized you are. If you cut all the pieces, you may end up with 200 or more pieces ready to assemble. This is overpowering for a beginner unless you are very well organized. We have incorporated a handy sticky album page which allows you to store your cutouts in numerical order, until they are ready to be assembled. It is really a question of choice.

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20. I have decided to cut everything at the start. How can I store these pieces in order?

As indicated above, we have included in your starter kit a very handy sticky album page that allows you to store your cutouts in order.

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21.What about coloring the edges? Is it necessary to color the edges of the cutouts and if so, with what?

As indicated above, if you cut properly (bevel cut) there is not need to color the edges of the cutouts. The reason some people color the edges is because they are not cutting correctly and to make up for this, they are attempting to disguise the edges. If you straight cut, then use either a soft lead pencil, or use a special felt marker. The marker must not be water based, as the ink will run, and penetrate the cutout damaging the image itself. Prior to using a spirit based felt marker, you should test the ink on part of a discarded piece of scrap from the prints you are using.

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22. Woops! I accidentally cut through a piece. Can I repair this cutout? How do I do it?

This very often happens on smaller pieces, either because the blade is dull, or because one has tried to extract a piece without it being completely cut. It can also happen because the piece is so small you have overcut. To repair the piece, take both segments you wish to join, turn them over, align them, and splice them with a piece of scotch tape. You can then trim the excess tape around the edges. The piece is now joined and ready to be shaped or glued.

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23. What is shaping? I read elsewhere all I have to do is stack one piece on the other?

Shaping is one of the primary skills besides cutting and gluing in Paper Tole. Shaping or sculpturing your cutouts really add realism to an otherwise lifeless 2 dimensional picture. Never stack the cutouts with successive identical pieces, as stacking implies, piling one flat piece on the other. Spend some time on identifying the shape you wish to give an element by studying the original picture to determine what shape it would be in real life. Should it be convex or concave. Where are the shadows on the piece?What does the leaf look like in real life. What type of shadow do I wish to create on my overall project? These are some of the many aspects you should take into consideration, but shaping and sculpturing is really what Paper Tole is all about. The primary aim is to stretch the paper, and to do so requires that you apply a great deal of force to the shaping tool, instead of just lightly "massaging" the paper.

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24. What tool should I use to shape the pieces? What is the best Shaping Tool?

From our experience, the Nylon Paper Shaper which we carry in our online store is a fabulous shaping tool for many reasons. First, unlike other copycat types which have mimicked its great profile, it is made from nylon, and not plastic. Being made from nylon has two distinct advantages. Firstly, it will not snap or break when you are applying pressure to the finer end. Secondly, it glides over the paper as if it were lubricated, making shaping a breeze. Similar plastic type tools do not move over the paper as nicely.

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25. When I shape some pieces, the paper crinkles on the edges. How do I correct this?

This very often happens on small round cutouts. If you wish to create a concave shape, start from the center of the cutout and slowly work outwards. Work on a very firm surface which does not have much give. Some of the shaping pads sold are too soft. We use a high density shaping mat which provides extra resistance. You may also like to try using an old piece of vinyl flooring with a foam back. This is ideal for shaping pieces that require a high degree of pressure on the tip of your shaping tool. If you wish to remove the crinkles that have formed, use a denser pad, and rework the edges with a lot of pressure on the tool. This will eliminate the crinkle look.

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26. What type of glue should I use?

You should only use non-acetic silicone. You can tell the difference between acetic and non-acetic silicone by its smell. The former generally has a vinegar type odor. Acetic silicone is used for glazing windows, or plumbing where it is desirable to get a good bond. This is achieved by the release of an acid that attacks the surface to roughen it up (etches the surface) so the silicone can bond properly. This is highly undesirable in Paper Tole. Imagine, you have done everything correctly, including mounting your print on an "acid free" mat board, and the next thing you are doing is destroying the long term survivability by using an acid based silicone. Does this sound logical? You will note that all museums use acid free components when they are mounting lithographs. This is called a museum mount, and ensures that the art will last for generations. This is exactly which you wish to achieve, and can achieve if you use the right components.

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27. I read somewhere that I should coat the back of my prints? Is this necessary?

This is definitely an optional move. Some people varnish or coat the backs of the prints to protect the image, so silicone will not migrate from the back to the front. This is true in two cases. When the print is so thin such migration is inevitable, or if they use acetic based silicone. Both instances above can be avoided by proper print selection and the non use of acetic silicone. All of our prints used in our kits are specifically made for Paper Tole, so the scenarios above do not apply.

The third reason some people coat the back of their prints, is to stiffen them so they can assume and hold a particular shape. This is particularly true in some feathering projects where long elongated pieces are used. Again, it is really a personal choice thing, but what can be said, is if you properly glue, then such stiffening is usually not necessary. It really is a matter of personal choice. You can use our varnish to accomplish this if you choose to do this.

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28. How much glue should I use?

A general rule of thumb is a dab every time the piece is the size of a quarter or 25 cent piece. As to the height you wish to achieve with the piece, this is strictly a personal choice. There is a technique in actually creating this "ice cream" effect when you squeeze the silicone out of the tube. Place the nozzle over the area you wish to apply the silicone and squeeze some out. As it is coming out, gently pull back slightly allowing a greater height to be formed. When you have achieved the height you want, hold the nozzle in position for a few seconds, and then quickly flick your wrist. This will result in a small tail being formed, hence it is sometimes called an "ice cream effect" or blob which some people call it. The silicone will retain its height integrity, and when you apply the cutout over the column of silicone, you can adjust the height by gently pressing down on the piece.

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29. I have a small piece I wish to glue, how can I apply a small amount of glue to the cutout?

There are several ways you can do this, but we generally use a toothpick. Squeeze a small amount of silicone onto a waste piece of paper. Use this as your resource and dip your toothpick into it to get a small amount on the end of the toothpick. You can then apply this to the back of the cutout. Once the glue is on the cutout, it can be placed either by using tweezers, or alternately, you can use the end of your knife. To use the knife technique, touch the blade against the area where you have applied the silicone. The cutout should adhere to the knife blade, and you can gently place the cutout in the correct area. Practice this a few times on a piece of scrap.

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30. Woops!! I accidentally smudged some silicone on my base print what can I do?

When working with silicone, it is important that you manage it correctly at all times, as things can rapidly get out of control. Have a Kleenex handy at all times, and keep the area in which you are working clean. Keep the cap on the silicone when not in use. If you do manage to get a spot on your base print, there is a product that is specifically designed to remove silicone. You can purchase it from your local craft store. Keep in mind, a smear of silicone on your base print which is visible, will virtually, visually destroy your project.

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31. Do I have to wait until the glue sets on the first piece before I apply another piece?

Silicone can take upwards of 5-7 minutes to skim over, and several hours to actually set correctly. You do not need to wait this time to continue to build. Once a piece is placed, there is no reason why you can not continue with your project, as long as you are careful not to dislodge what you have glued. Silicone has enough body to hold your pieces in place as long as they are not displaced. Just be careful.

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32. I glued a piece down, but do not like the way I shaped it, what can I do?

If you want to remove a piece that has been glued there are two considerations. If if has recently been placed then removing it is no problem. Carefully clean off the back of the cutout, and reshape. If the glue has set, then you can easily cut off the piece by sliding your knife under the piece and cutting if off. Alternately you can snip it off with a pair of scissors. Scrape the dry silicone off the back, reshape and re-glue. No need for an extra print here folks!!

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33. I saw some paper tole pictures that were built out a mile!! Is this correct? My work looks flat compared to this??

This is really a hot topic among beginners. When you start this craft, there is a tendency to be much too conservative, as to how much you build your picture out. I always tell people to "go for it" and be radical. Through time, you will develop your own style. I have seen some great pieces that have adopted the conservative approach, and some fantastic finished tole, where the creator has been radical. The nice aspect of this craft, is that there is no real right or wrong way. It is a fun individual craft. You will find what is right for you, but it actually helps you to experiment.

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34. How long do I have to wait for the glue to dry before I varnish?

This really depends on the climatic conditions in your local area and the type of varnish you are using. The rule of thumb is that you should wait at least 24 hours. This however is not attainable when working in a teaching situation, where students want to finish their project during the course of the class. In that case, you should wait at least half an hour, and be very careful that you do not dislodge things. Try to wait 24 hours between coats of varnish, and use the correct varnish otherwise, you finish will go yellow. Keep in mind that there are different forces at play as the glue is drying and the varnish layers are drying. This is what generally causes cracking with two or three different layers drying at the same time with their own dynamic stresses being created.

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35. What about varnishing? Do I cover everything with varnish?

Beginners like to cover everything with a glaze for some reason. As to what areas you glaze is another personal choice. Just a few hints here. Look critically at the picture, and visualize what would naturally appear shiny, or naturally reflect light. This is really the key. Some people use no varnish, which retains the mat look, particularly with Anton Pieck prints. Other people selectively glaze areas which enhances the overall project in a delicate way, and heightens the 3d effect. Personally, I treat each project differently. Some I selectively glaze, others have no finish whatsoever.

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36. How many coats of varnish should I use?

This really depends on the effect you wish to achieve. Keep in mind the first coat of glaze generally is absorbed by the paper and really is the "keying coat". The first coat when dried will have a dull appearance. Subsequent coats will liven the surface up. With a water based varnish, generally 3 or 4 coats are needed to achieve a glossy finish. With a lacquer, 3 coats are generally sufficient.

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37. How long should I wait between coats?

This depends on local climatic conditions. In the summer, where the ambient temperature is warm, 24 hours between coats is sufficient. In the winter, where the temperature is lower, and the humidity is still high, you should wait at least 3 days. I know this sounds long, but ask your husband or partner how many times they have applied a varnish type finish and re-coated too soon only to find out the paint surface has gone opaque.

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38. I have varnished an area, and I do not think I like it, can I remove the varnish?

The best thing to do in this case is to cut the piece off and replace it with a new piece.

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39. Okay, everything looks great, what options do I have regarding framing?

I would hate to count the number of "finished" pieces of tole that lay in peoples drawers unframed and unfinished. On some of your first finished pieces, you may not want to spend a lot on framing if you consider them learning projects. Framing does not have to be expensive, and there are alternatives to framing. You can mount your base print on a block of wood whose edges have been routered, and affix a holder to this plaque. This is a low cost method to ensure your work can be displayed. Alternately, you can buy an inexpensive frame, and frame it yourself. If your finished piece is your dream project, then it is worth spending the money on getting proper mats cut, and having it framed professionally.

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40. I saw some budget frames at the Warehouse, can I use these for my Paper Tole project?

Most definitely. Even if the frame does not have a deep rebate, to keep the elements from contacting the glass, you can use an inexpensive frame, and simply build the back out. This is accomplished by using strips of foam core which are approx. 10mm thick and to whatever width you want to cut them. You form a box with the strips of foam core, and insert them into the back of the frame. By gluing and creating this box. you actually extend the picture out the back of the frame, and create space so your tole can be inserted. By proper taping, it is not noticeable, and you can accomplish with a $3.00 frame, what would have normally been much more expensive using conventional deep rebated framing.

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41, Everyone loves my work, and I have been asked to Tole a Family Photograph. Can I do this?

Photographs are extremely hard to tole in the sense, that the image lines are not clear and concise and have an extended depth of field introducing elements that are almost impossible to tole. If you are in the position to actually compose the picture yourself, then consider the following. Try to use a short depth of field so elements in the background are not in focus. This eliminates the requirement that you have to tole them, and instead you can focus your efforts on the main subjects. Photographs are very difficult to tole and to make really nice.

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42. I like your FAQ section...How do I get you to impart more of your knowledge to me?

Well you made it to the last section, and if you think this has been worthwhile, drop us a line of encouragement at sales@papertolekits.com either with specific questions you would like us to cover, or just a few lines saying you gained some positive information, and with enough encouragement *smile* I am sure we would add to this.

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Caroline Spencer
Copyright 2004 Paper Tole Kits.com . All rights reserved.
Revised: January, 2003

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